The Euro Nymph, Step-by-Step Tying Instructions

Everyone knows how to tie Euro Nymphs, right?

Maybe not.

Well everyone watches YouTube when they want to learn how to tie flies, right?

Maybe not.

Each of us has our own way of learning, and our own experience level, and our own reasons for learning to tie new flies.

Some readers might like to see the step-by-step photos that depict the tying of Euro Nymphs. So I decided to take a break from a MONSTER BLOG POST I am currently working on. The big feature will be a head-to-toe, toe-to-head discussion of synthetic winging materials. From EP, Craft Fur, Ice Fur, Strung Fuzzy Fiber, and on down the list to Steve Farrar’s Flash Blend and beyond.

So I headed out to the garage, tied up a Euro Nymph with accompanying photos, came back inside, downloaded the images, cropped the images, began to write, and realized that my Euro Nymph did not look the way I wanted it to, especially not under the harsh revealing perspective of the Macro Lens.

Back at it again this week, and I’m happy with the results.

So here goes.

Here is my Gammie Jig Hook,  a size 14. This is a good size to start with, but you will be tying size 16s and 18s eventually.

Here is my Gammie Jig Hook, a size 14. This is a good size to start with, but you will be tying size 16s and 18s eventually.

Here is my Gammie Jig Hook, a size 14. This is a good size to start with, but you will be tying size 16s and 18s eventually. There is a bead on the hook too.

I have added my thread to the hook, using neat, touching wraps. The touchinbg wraps are not 100% essential, but these are a mark of crafts-personship, and I like the touch.

I have added my thread to the hook, using neat, touching wraps. The touchinbg wraps are not 100% essential, but these are a mark of crafts-personship, and I like the touch.

I have added my thread to the hook, using neat, touching wraps. The touching wraps are not 100% essential, but these are a mark of crafts-personship, and I like the touch.

This is my tail materialCoq de Leon Feathers. These are beautifully marked. I only need three fibers for the tail. This doesn't sound like much, but it is plenty.

This is my tail materialCoq de Leon Feathers. These are beautifully marked. I only need three fibers for the tail. This doesn’t sound like much, but it is plenty.

This is my tail material Coq de Leon Feathers. These are beautifully marked. I only need three fibers for the tail. This doesn’t sound like much, but it is plenty.

You see?  Not much material here, but it is plenty, trust me please.

You see? Not much material here, but it is plenty, trust me please.

I have attachted the tail fivers to the hook in this photo. I am using Damville FlyMaster 70D thread. I could be tying this fly with a Veevus  8/0 or 10/0 thread just as well.

I have attachted the tail fivers to the hook in this photo. I am using Damville FlyMaster 70D thread. I could be tying this fly with a Veevus 8/0 or 10/0 thread just as well.

I have attached the tail fivers to the hook in this photo. I am using Damville FlyMaster 70D thread. I could be tying this fly with a Veevus 8/0 or 10/0 thread just as well.

Nothing fancy here, I only continued wrapoing my thread forward on the hook, I will want to build-up the thread base to provide a taper to the body and this is a good time to start.

Nothing fancy here, I only continued wrapoing my thread forward on the hook, I will want to build-up the thread base to provide a taper to the body and this is a good time to start.

Nothing fancy here, I only continued wrapping my thread forward on the hook, I will want to build-up the thread base to provide a taper to the body and this is a good time to start.

I have added a piece of Brassie size copper wire, but this is a nice chartreuse green color wire to contrast on the body. I am showing this here because the wire is wrapped neatly on the top of the shank from just at the bead clear to the back of the body, and the wire is on top of the hook.

I have added a piece of Brassie size copper wire, but this is a nice chartreuse green color wire to contrast on the body. I am showing this here because the wire is wrapped neatly on the top of the shank from just at the bead clear to the back of the body, and the wire is on top of the hook.

I have added a piece of Brassie size copper wire, but this is a nice chartreuse green color wire to contrast on the body. I am showing this here because the wire is wrapped neatly on the top of the shank from just at the bead clear to the back of the body, and the wire is on top of the hook.

Now the story gets interesting. In this photo, I have added a piece (make it 6-inches long so you can hang on to it) of Veevus clear Pearl Tinsel. Make sure you wrap this down securely because you will put some tension on this when you begin winding it on the hook shaft.

Now the story gets interesting. In this photo, I have added a piece (make it 6-inches long so you can hang on to it) of Veevus clear Pearl Tinsel. Make sure you wrap this down securely because you will put some tension on this when you begin winding it on the hook shaft.

Now the story gets interesting. In this photo, I have added a piece (make it 6-inches long so you can hang on to it) of Veevus clear Pearl Tinsel. Make sure you wrap this down securely because you will put some tension on this when you begin winding it on the hook shaft.

Alright. I took hold of the pearl tinsel, which is really a plastic-like material, and wound it around the hook nearly to the bead. You do not need to go all the way to the bead because you will next put on a thorax and cover the area next to the bead, but get at least close, OK?

Alright. I took hold of the pearl tinsel, which is really a plastic-like material, and wound it around the hook nearly to the bead. You do not need to go all the way to the bead because you will next put on a thorax and cover the area next to the bead, but get at least close, OK?

Alright. I took hold of the pearl tinsel, which is really a plastic-like material, and wound it around the hook nearly to the bead. You do not need to go all the way to the bead because you will next put on a thorax and cover the area next to the bead, but get at least close, OK?

This photo shows that i have added the green wire rib on top of the pearl tinsel. What you can not see is the fact that I applied considerable pressure to the pearl tinsel and made it deform or should I say conform to the hook and not be loose and saggy. The wire rib is the same process, and I put as much pressure as reasonable to seat the rib into the body. You will need to develop a feel for the proper amount of pressure. Too much and the material will break. Too little and the material will be loose and slip on the hook.

This photo shows that i have added the green wire rib on top of the pearl tinsel. What you can not see is the fact that I applied considerable pressure to the pearl tinsel and made it deform or should I say conform to the hook and not be loose and saggy. The wire rib is the same process, and I put as much pressure as reasonable to seat the rib into the body. You will need to develop a feel for the proper amount of pressure. Too much and the material will break. Too little and the material will be loose and slip on the hook.

This photo shows that I have added the green wire rib on top of the pearl tinsel. What you can not see is the fact that I applied considerable pressure to the pearl tinsel and made it deform or should I say conform to the hook and not be loose and saggy. The wire rib is the same process, and I put as much pressure as reasonable to seat the rib into the body. You will need to develop a feel for the proper amount of pressure. Too much and the material will break. Too little and the material will be loose and slip on the hook.

This photo shows how little dubbing i will use for the thorax on this nymph. This is peacock ice dub. Ok, it isn't really, but I forgot what it is and  I know that you can use almost any dubbing and the fly will fish so there is no real harm done by saying it is peacock ice dub. the most important matter is that it only takes a very small amount of material to tie the thorax, and I will rub it between my wax-moistened fingers to get it on my thread.

This photo shows how little dubbing I will use for the thorax on this nymph. This is peacock ice dub. Ok, it isn’t really, but I forgot what it is and I know that you can use almost any dubbing and the fly will fish so there is no real harm done by saying it is peacock ice dub. the most important matter is that it only takes a very small amount of material to tie the thorax, and I will rub it between my wax-moistened fingers to get it on my thread.

This photo shows how little dubbing I will use for the thorax on this nymph. This is peacock ice dub. Ok, it isn’t really, but I forgot what it is and I know that you can use almost any dubbing and the fly will fish so there is no real harm done by saying it is peacock ice dub. The most important matter is that it only takes a very small amount of material to tie the thorax, and I will rub it between my wax-moistened fingers to get it on my thread.

Here it is. That miniscule pinch of dubbing is on my thread and ready to wind around my hook.

Here it is. That miniscule pinch of dubbing is on my thread and ready to wind around my hook.

Here it is. That minuscule pinch of dubbing is on my thread and ready to wind around my hook.

Here is my first thorax. This is not as full as I want it, so I will add a little.

Here is my first thorax. This is not as full as I want it, so I will add a little.

Here is my first thorax. This is not as full as I want it, so I will add a little.

Here is my thorax with the PERFECT bulk. Next, I want to add a color-spot made of my tying thread.

Here is my thorax with the PERFECT bulk. Next, I want to add a color-spot made of my tying thread.

Here is my thorax with the PERFECT bulk. Next, I want to add a color-spot made of my tying thread.

I counted - it took me 30 turnjs of thread around the hook and behind the bead to build my color spot. I will now add a dot of cement, SG, or depleted uranium to secure the thread at this point.

I counted – it took me 30 turnjs of thread around the hook and behind the bead to build my color spot. I will now add a dot of cement, SG, or depleted uranium to secure the thread at this point.

I counted – it took me 30 turns of thread around the hook and behind the bead to build my color spot. I will now add a dot of cement, SG, or depleted uranium to secure the thread at this point.

Done. Ready to catch big trout> PINCH THE BARB PLEASE. IT IS EASY WITH THESE GAMMIE MICRO BARBS. THANK YOU. GAMMIE MAKES A BARBLESS HOOK EXACTLY LIKE THIS TOO.

Done. Ready to catch big trout> PINCH THE BARB PLEASE. IT IS EASY WITH THESE GAMMIE MICRO BARBS. THANK YOU. GAMMIE MAKES A BARBLESS HOOK EXACTLY LIKE THIS TOO.

Done. Ready to catch big trout> PINCH THE BARB PLEASE. IT IS EASY WITH THESE GAMMIE MICRO BARBS. THANK YOU. GAMMIE MAKES A BARBLESS HOOK EXACTLY LIKE THIS TOO.

Perfection held in the palm of my hand.

Perfection held in the palm of my hand.

Perfection held in the palm of my hand.

I hope this helps ….

May each of you find and share some measure of kindness this day.

Jay Nicholas, February 2021

 

 

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