The Tug is the Drug: Reading and Music with Chris Santella May 3rd 5pm

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Please join us for an evening of fun with our favorite fly fishing author. Chris Santella will be at The Caddis Fly on May 3rd from 5pm. Stop on by and say hello, bring a book to have him sign, have a beer and listen to some of his new book.

The Tug is the Drug, a compilation of fly fishing essays from the New York Times and Beyond, is the 20th book from Chris Santella, author of Fifty Places To Fly Fish Before You Die. The essays reflect on fly fishing for mako sharks in San Diego to the moral quandary of nymphing for steelhead to reminiscences of winding up at Beavertail Campground with a broken axle to profiles of Frank Moore and Lefty Kreh. Chris will read a few selections and play a few fly-fishing inspired songs that have been recorded by his band, Catch & Release.

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Chris Santella is the author of the “Fifty Places” series from Abrams Books, as well as Why I Fly Fish, The Hatch is On and CatWars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer. He is a regular contributor to Fly Rod & Reel, Fly Fish Journal, Trout, American Angler, The Drake, and Washington Post, among other publications.

Posted in Oregon Fly Fishing Clubs and Events, Oregon fly fishing links | Leave a comment

Featured Tyer: Bill Harsey

#tiedwithcaddisflyshop

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For those who know of Bill Harsey, he is a knife maker. He designs and prototypes blades, handles and all, and then sends his designs to a number of different companies for machining and production*. Not only does he make them, but he’s darn good at it. Bill’s design won the “Best American Made Knife” Award at the International Blade Show in 2016. He is one of the most innovative craftsmen in his industry, and his flare for innovation doesn’t stop there. Bill is also known at The Caddis Fly Shop as a magnificent fly tyer, and one of our most loyal customers.

I’ve been fortunate to talk with Bill a number of times in shop, and on his last visit we got to chatting about how he selects his materials for patterns.

“I like to pick my materials by creating a color pallet, not focusing so much on what I’m picking, but just putting together a good mix,” Bill said, standing with me, admiring our great walls of chenille, dubbing, beads, cones, fur and feathers.

“I don’t make too many plans, I just come in, explore and see what I can come up with! I only buy my materials at Caddis. I’ve been getting my stuff [here] since Chris was still in diapers,” Bill said with a hearty grin.

Bill has been tying flies since he was in the 7th grade, and it’s given him ample time to practice. He ties both traditional ties, and experiments with his own recipes. A couple of his favorite ties are pictured below.

One of Bill’s traditional Hoppers:

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(Tied on a size 8 long shank. TMC5262 or TMC3761 will work!)

Bill’s own creation, the Desert Camo Hopper:

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(Tied on a size 8 long shank. TMC2302 is the ticket.)

The recipes for these flies are Bill’s own, but you can tie flies like these with the following products, available at The Caddis Fly Angling Shop and www.caddisflyshop.com:

Hareline Thin Fly Foam (both hoppers)

Desert Hopper:

Grizzly Barred Rubber Legs

Copic Sketch Markers

Traditional Hopper:

All Purpose Deer Hair

Knotted Hopper Legs

Ozark Oak Mottled Turkey Wing

Whenever Bill comes into the shop, it seems, he has a new tie to share. The following fly has my favorite conception story.

The Oregon Coachman:

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Bill’s version of the classic Black Coachman was inspired by a University of Oregon football game–and, as he likes to add, a bit of beer. The University of Oregon was playing a game in the 2016 season and Bill had “had a few”, which meant the talk had moved on from simple game chat. As he watched the players move across the field he couldn’t believe how little school spirit their uniforms held in their design.

“I can tie a fly with more school colors than they’re wearing today!” he exclaimed.

And he did just that. The Oregon Coachman is a tie to put the UofO jerseys that day to shame, and it’s just the pattern that gets Bill’s fellow fly tyers excited about what we can come up with for our next personal patterns.

If you wish to tie a Coachman in the style of your school colors or any other of your favorite teams, you can do so with the appropriate color palate of the following ingredients:

Teal Feathers

Squirrel Tail

Rooster Hackle

Uni Floss

Veevus 10/0 or 6/0 Danville Thread

TMC100BL #12

Some boxes of additional Harsey flies:

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We are more than proud to help stock such a phenomenal tiers bench, and we are glad to be able to share his work here. If you are a tier who uses materials purchased at The Caddis Fly Angling Shop and you would like to share your ties with us (and our readers!) please email us at caddiseug@yahoo.com. We’d love to see and share your work as a Featured Tyer!

For those of you on Instagram, follow the shop @caddisflyshop and please feel free to tag the flies you tie using material purchased at The Caddis Fly Shop with the hashtag #tiedwithcaddisflyshop. We’ll repost your flies to our feed to show off your fly tying style!

Tight lines and tight ties everybody.

-Maddy Bell-

*For more information about Bill, visit his Wikipedia page here.

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Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

Jigged 20 Incher Fly Tying Video

In this instructional fly tying video Tony Torrence demonstrates how to tie the Jigged 20 Incher Nymph. Jigged flies are all the rage because they snag the bottom less, making them the perfect point fly in a two fly “nymphing rig”. Tony shows how to add lead to the fly and form a shaped “underbody” using Uni-stretch, allowing to you to form the body to the perfect taper. The 20 Incher has proven to be a great fish catcher for Trout and Half-pounder steelhead in our Northwest Waters.

20 incher pic

Jigged 20 Incher


Thread: Veevus 10/0 Black

Hook: TMC C400BL, sizes 8-14
Bead: Hareline Gold Slotted Tungsten Bead
Underbody: Lead Wire 6-10 Wraps, Black Uni-Stretch
Tail: Brown Goose Biots
Rib: Hareline Tan Life Flex or Veevus Small Gold Oval Tinsel
Abdomen: 3-4 Strands Peacock Herl
Wingcase: Turkey Tail (pre-treated with Softex)
Hackle: Partridge
Thorax: Hareline Hare’s Ear Dubbin
Optional: apply Loon Flow to wing case when tying complete to increase durability.

Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

Spring Cleaning Sale on Now at The Caddis Fly

spring sale clothes

It’s time to make room for new soft goods at the shop this spring. We are closing out sportswear and outwear from great brands like Patagonia and Simms. Most items are marked at 40% off. We invite you to come down and have look this weekend. You can also browse the availability at the following pages on our website.

Patagonia Sportswear
Patagonia Outerwear

Simms Sportswear
Simms Outerwear

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Who We Are Series 6: Jay Nicholas

This series of posts is meant to introduce all of you terrific tiers and cool customers to our small, but fantastic team of anglers here at The Caddis Fly Angling Shop. Each employee answered a number of questions about their fishing expertise, their favorite style of fishing and fishing products. Each week we will publish another employee’s answers to these questions to let you know Who We Are. This series will hopefully give you a peak into who we are, how we fish, and who you are chatting with when you next call or email Caddis.

Who: Jay Nicholas. OregonFlyFishingBlog blogger, writer and general Expert Angler

Jay Nicholas - circa 1980

Jay Nicholas on Elk River – circa 1980 – Photo by Bob Hooton

Time at Caddis: My support for the Shop began in about 2008.

Are you a Eugene local, or are you a transplant? 

I’ve called Corvallis my home off and on since starting college in 1967. A few years in the US Navy and an ODFW assignment at Elk River were temporary adventures away from my Valley “hometown”. I’m classified as a client service specialist and provide general support to Chris and the Shop staff – plus creating video and blog content. I’ve probably produced close to a hundred fly videos on the blog. My support for the Shop began in about 2008.

How many years have you been fly fishing?

I’ve been fly fishing since about 1962 or 63.

Jay Nicholas circa 2015

Jay Nicholas at the fly bench – circa 2015

What is your favorite rod and reel combo?

Impossible to answer with one product.

I fish Echo, Winston, Scott, Sage, Redington, and Burkheimer rods with Hatch, Nautilus, Hardy, and Bauer reels – whether fishing freshwater estuary or ocean – I love ‘em all, from 3 wt. glass switch rods, 4 wt. single hand rods, clear up to powerful 12 wt rods that I fish for Tuna in the ocean.

Wet wade or float, and why?

Yes – I do it all from the upper coast range to the ocean. I follow the fish of the season.

Dry fly, streamer or nymph–and do you tie them?

Yes to all. And I tie ‘em all too. That said, my days of tying size #22 dry flies and nymphs are done for good. These days my favorite flies are certainly in the steelhead and salmon demographic, with sea run cutthroat flies in close order.

Spey or single hand cast? 

Of course. I may fish a single hand rod for salmon for three months straight, followed by four months swinging flies on two hand switch and spey rods.

Salt or Freshwater?

Yep. My freshwater season is year-round, but the ocean season is weather dependent, and I hope for April through September.

Jay on the ocean circa 2016

Jay on the ocean circa 2016

Where have you fished?

States: California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Georgia, British Columbia

Waters: Cascade Lakes, Oregon Coastal Rivers, Columbia River Tributaries (Deschutes, John Day), Northern CA Coastal Rivers, Klamath waters, Dean River, Bella Coola River, Gold River, *Pacific City (OR)

What is your favorite part about working at Caddis?

Great people. I especially enjoy working with Chris. This man knows no limits to energy, creativity, and imagination. It is common for us to be on the phone or chatting by email at 5 AM and then he will head out to the river to guide or into the shop to help fill orders and meet with Industry Reps.

When a fellow angler asks, “What is the biggest fish you have ever caught?” what is your answer? 

The next fish I hook.

Jay is one of the most prolific tiers on the West coast, if not in the fly fishing industry. Just last month we put a box of Jay Exclusive streamers and articulated flies up front that had more flies than we could count–and he’s still tying! Many of the tying videos on our caddisflyshop youtube channel are sessions with Jay. He is a wonderful teacher and a great example for all levels of fly tiers.

As an author, Jay has written numerous books about subjects ranging from fly tying to the art of fly fishing itself, available at The Caddis Fly Shop. He is also one of the main contributions to oregonflyfishingblog.com. Even more of his writing can be found at his personal blog, https://fishingwithjay.wordpress.com.

Jay is having some fun here during winter steelhead season.

Jay is having some fun here during winter steelhead season.

He isn’t normally found in shop, but some Saturdays you can find him doing tying demonstrations in the back by the Patagonia duffels and sling packs. We’ll keep you posted right here with updates on the next chance to meet and chat with Jay; conversing with him about fly fishing, tying or truly any subject is a wonderful learning experience.

Want to know more about the Caddis Fly? Visit our website’s About page at this link and feel free to call or email us any time at our contacts below:

(541)505-8061

caddiseug@yahoo.com

Tight lines until next time!

The Caddis Fly Crew
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TU Presents John Shewey: Fly Fishing Oregon’s Dry Side

Trout Unlimited presents an evening with John Shewey, Oregon-based veteran steelheader, journalist, photographer, author, and noted fly tier whose elegant steelhead flies have earned national prominence. The editor-in-chief of the Northwest Fly Fishing magazine group, John has penned hundreds of articles and published countless photographs and to date has authored more than a dozen books. Enjoy a few cold ones from Vagabond Brewing while John provides a presentation on his experiences fly fishing Oregon’s dry side.

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Following John’s presentation, stick around and learn more about getting involved on the ground level of a new Trout Unlimited Chapter starting up in Salem.

This event is free and open to the public. 21 and over.

Wednesday, May 3 from 6 PM – 8 PM
Vagabond Brewing
2195 Hyacinth St NE Ste 172, Salem, Oregon 97301

Facebook event is here.

Posted in Oregon Conservation News, Oregon Fly Fishing Clubs and Events | Leave a comment

Purple & Black Rabbit Strip Steelhead Tube Fly with Jay Nicholas

Purple & Black Rabbit Strip Tube Fly by Nicholas 2017

Purple & Black Rabbit Strip Tube Fly by Nicholas 2017

Here is yet another version of the many rabbit strip tube flies you will see that are deadly when fished for steelhead and many species of salmonids. This Purple and black version of the fly silly deadly but I suppose that is a case of stating the obvious because all flies that contain rabbit strip are also deadly.

I still plan on featuring other color variations of this same pattern (I hope) so our subscribers will have the option of watching each video to see what kind of stories I tell or not watching all of the silly rabbit strip videos since once you have seen how to tie one fly you can probably think up your own color combinations and get on with it on your own.

But as always, I wish you well and hope you enjoy tying and fishing these flies.

Here goes . . . . .

Tube: Pro Sportfisher Micro Tube or medium classic tube
Hook guide: Purple large
Hook option: Owner #2 straight eye or OPST Swing hook #2
Rabbit StripBlack barred Purple
Hackle: Black Schlappen or marabou
Cone: Pro Sportfisher Ultra Sonic Disc Gunsmoke Metallic

I hope you see possibilities in this fly’s color hue and composition

Jay Nicholas – winter season 2016/17

Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | 1 Comment

Ten Flies for Your Weekend Fishing on our Local Waters

weekend flies for the mckenzie

If you are heading out to the McKenzie or Willamette Rivers this weekend don’t be caught without the following fly patterns. To maximize success be prepared to fish at all levels of the water column. Deep nymphing, swinging wet flies and dry fly fishing have produced good results depending upon the time of day and water type.

Jigged Hare’s Ear
Jigged Prince Nymph
Jigged Possie Bugger
Mega Prince
Parachute Adams
Bear’s Hi Vis Blue Winged Olive
Silvey’s Soft Serve March Brown Wet
Peacock Caddis
Mimic May March Brown
Foam Elk Hair Caddis Black

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The shot above is our new logo waterproof silicon self healing box. Check out all styles here.

Posted in Fishing Reports, Lower Willamette, McKenzie River, Middle Fork Willamette River fishing | Leave a comment

Who We Are Series Post 5: Tim Etlick

This series of posts is meant to introduce all of you terrific tiers and cool customers to our small, but fantastic team of anglers here at The Caddis Fly Angling Shop. Each employee answered a number of questions about their fishing expertise, their favorite style of fishing and fishing products. Each week we will publish another employee’s answers to these questions to let you know Who We Are. This series will hopefully give you a peak into who we are, how we fish, and who you are chatting with when you next call or email Caddis.

Want to chat with someone who has fished all over the United States? You should talk to Tim.

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Who: Tim Etlick, Sales Floor

Years at Caddis: 2

Are you a Eugene local, or are you a transplant? 

Not a Eugene local. Moved here from a short stint in Redding Ca. but I have lived all over Oregon and Colorado mainly.

How many years have you been fly fishing?

37 years

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What is your favorite rod and reel combo?

Sage X 13′ 0″ 7wt Spey with an English made Hardy Marquis

Wet wade or float, and why?

Both. Some rivers are more conducive to one or the other, but rowing a boat and reading the river is my favorite way to travel. It is a great skill to have that can take you many places.

Dry fly, streamer or nymph–and do you tie them?

Dry fly for Steelie! I tie most of my flies.

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Spey or single hand cast? 

Both, but spey is my favorite.

Salt or Freshwater?

Pretty much freshwater–I’ve never fished the salt before.

Where do you fish?

States: Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, (British Columbia), Minnesota, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico

Waters: Willamette River, Mckenzie River, Deschutes River and many others.

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What is your favorite part about working at Caddis?

The dealio’s and meeting other cool people

When a fellow angler asks, “What is the biggest fish you have ever caught?” what is your answer? 

Not a question I get asked a lot.

Tim is a wealth of Spey fishing knowledge, and knows our local rivers intimately. If he isn’t in the shop (usually Thursday through Sunday), he is out on the Willamette or the Mckenzie. For these reasons, ask Tim if you want to know how the rivers are working or whether or not the steelhead are making inland moves. In shop, Tim can be found helping customers pick out their next set of waders and boots, or assisting with a gear repair. He’s known as our “Spey Expert” so if you want to get into the snap-T trend, ask for Tim.

Want to know more about the Caddis Fly? Visit our website’s About page at this link and feel free to call or email us any time at our contacts below:

(541)505-8061

caddiseug@yahoo.com

Tight lines until next time!

The Caddis Fly Crew

 

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Lower Mckenzie Fishing Report 4/10/17

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The Caddis Fly Shop end of the week crew took a day and headed out to the lower Mckenzie.   Please, no adjustment of your monitor is necessary. The blue stuff in the pic above was just a momentary lapse in darkness, and heavy showers.   The river had good color and has survived the weeks of high levels.    As the river continues to drop, boaters should keep a cautious eye out for possible river hazards.

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The usual suspects, Mega Prince and jigged Hare’s Ear were working quite well.   Also the rubber legged Possie Bugger added some nice contributions.

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We did observe some surface activity with caddis and some March Browns.  Occasional rising was observed on this day.   Opportunities for surface activity will increase as our weather improves.  The main issue has been the continued high river levels.   A much needed snow pack is a blessing, but not without consequences for valley anglers.

With the current forecast (if you believe it!) “showery” weather will continue.   Translation:  DO NOT LEAVE YOUR RAIN GEAR AT HOME!   Get out there and enjoy our spring.  The weekend looks “showery!”

T7

LV

Posted in Fishing Reports, McKenzie River | Leave a comment

IF4 2017 in Eugene

The International Fly Fishing Film Festival is a collection of professionally made fly fishing videos from around the globe that highlight the beauty and culture of fly fishing. This is an exciting night of watching the fly fishing films, and raffling off over $5000 in great fishing gear, art, and trips donated by some of the best retailers and guides in the business.

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Wildish Community Theater | April 19, 2017
Doors open at 6:15 PM. Film begins AT 7:00 PM.
Hosted By: True West Custom Fly Rods, Caddis Fly Shop and Homewaters Fly Shop
Funds raised from this event will benefit Fly Fishing Colloborative.
Tickets will also be available for $15.00 at: Caddis Fly Shop & Home Waters Fly Shop and if available, for $18.00 at the door on the day of the event.
Buy tickets online here
For more information, please contact event organizer at info@flyfilmfest.com

Posted in Oregon Fly Fishing Clubs and Events | Leave a comment

ECHO OHS (One Hand Spey) Fly Rod Review

I’ll start out by reporting that I devoted a full 10 days this winter season fishing the new ECHO OHS (One Hand Spey) rod nearly exclusively. Nearly means that I occasionally fished my Scott Switch or my Burkheimer 7115-4 in order to provide a frame of reference to the new rod, comparing the relative performance of rods I’ve fished extensively in past seasons versus the new OHS rod.

Leading the fly on my Echo OHS 7 wt.

Leading the fly on my Echo OHS 7 wt.

I started out with the 7 wt. OHS and an AIRFLO Scout head in 270 gr (if I remember right) as recommended by my friend Tyler Allen. I fished this with a 12 ft. 132 gr OPST Commando tip. This match didn’t fit my double spey casting stroke at all.

Next day, I called Tyler and he got me on the phone with Tim Rajeff, who set me straight. Thank you. Tim was enthusiastic and as usual his expertise in rod design and line performance is  daunting for mere mortals to absorb. As always, he kindly walked me though the technical aspects of the OHS rod’s origins and capabilities.

Tim started out by reminding me that the OHS was developed with one hand spey casting in mind (OK, I missed that) and therefore the head weight recommendation was based on the inclusion of a “haul” at the initiation of the casting stroke, thereby loading the rod to its full potential. In contrast, I was NOT using the rod single hand—I was entirely using a two-hand traditional spey style using snap T and double spey style casts. Consequently, the 270 gr head was not adequately loading the rod and I also figured out (with Tim’s coaching) that the 132 gr tip was near the limit of the light head’s turnover ability. Heavier heads generally have more mass at the line tip, affording greater ability to turn over big tips and the 270 struggled with such a massive tip

With Tim’s coaching, I set out on my second day on the water with a 330 gr Scout and 10 ft T-10 tip. Oh my, what a difference! My first cast with this head/tip combination on the 7 wt. OHS produced spectacular results. I was all smiles. My two-hand casting shifted like a switch from a chore to a pleasure.

Echo OHS 7 wt. and Olive Tube Steelhead Fly.

Echo OHS 6 wt. and Olive Tube Steelhead Fly.

I’ll note that I also fished the 6 wt. OHS (matched perfectly with a 270 gr Scout and 8 ft T-10. I assume that the 8 wt. OHS would sing if matched with a 390 gr Scout or similar weight super short head. The 330 gr. Scout cast the Airflo 10 ft T-10 and the 12 ft. 96 gr. OPST tips beautifully.

I often remind people that I am not an expert Spey caster. Far from it. I have friends who are capable of providing far more insightful detail on the mechanics of rods and lines. Still, I probably represent the intermediate skill level among fly anglers, so if a rod and line combination works for me, it is likely to work well for a wide range of anglers.

Here is my overall assessment of the ECHO OHS rod: fantastic.

At 10 ft 4 in. this rod is a huge advantage when fishing close quarters like I often do. I was able to cast under trees, with trees to my left and right, and cover steelhead water in comfortable style in places where I would be frustrated with rods even a foot longer.

Surprisingly, when I stepped into the open, my casting range was also excellent, and I was able to cast as far (with no obvious additional effort) as I could with my Scott and Burkheimer rods that are roughly a foot longer.

The OHS is shockingly light compared to most switch rods in the 7 wt. class even though they are but a foot longer. I found myself able to make both short and long casts easily and cover the water exactly as I wished.

The OHS handle is shorter than you will find on switch rods, but it seems just right to me, as I normally place my top-hand immediately above the reel no matter which two hand rod I’m fishing.

I’ll remind you that I only fished the OHS as a two hander (exception in the following paragraph) so the line weights I have noted will probably need to be adjusted downward if you are a full-on single hand caster. The haul to load the rod is not in my repertoire as of this writing – but I bet you would love this rod series if you are a single hander using Spey style casts.

Here's Jay Nicholas fishing tight quarters with the ECHO OHS 7 wt rod.

Here’s Jay Nicholas fishing tight quarters with the ECHO OHS 7 wt rod.

OK – I fished one day from a boat this winter, drifting down the Nestucca with friends while fishing an egg pattern under a strike indictor. I fished the 6 wt. OHS with a 7 wt. Indicator line. I found this to be a fantastic rod for bobber-dogging, executing roll and overhead casts while delivering my rig to the slots and ledges just as intended. Is the OHS superior other rod options? It just might be. I do not do enough single hand nymphing to be as confident as I am when this rod’s performance as a two-hander is concerned. As a two hander and a single hander, I was very pleased with the rod. As a two hander, I am still amazed at how well I was able to cast and handle my swing in every circumstance I encountered.

The OHS rod comes with a screw-in butt section that is a little longer than usual. In theory, the longer butt would only be used in the two-hand mode, but I found I preferred it all the time.

One matter about casting the OHS in two-hand style is that I was very comfortable keeping both of my elbows close to my side, and never ever pushing out with my top-hand. The rod’s relatively short overall stature combined with the shorter than usual handle might seem to lure a caster to extend their hands while casting, but I did not find this to be necessary or desirable.

For truly big water, I would still choose a longer Spey rod with longer head, and may be leaning towards a FIST style head that would allow me to dig the swing under the surface turbulence. But for the vast majority of places I fish on typical Oregon coastal rivers, the ECHO OHS rod performs superbly.

I asked Tyler Allen of ECHO/AIRFLO to give me his take on the OHS to back up my review, and the following is his response.

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“Jay:  as requested, here’s a bit of info about our new ECHO OHS and its applications:

In single-hand mode, the OHS is an incredibly versatile fishing tool, allowing the angler to incorporate a haul into their single-spey or roll cast. The additional casting distance afforded by a well-timed haul – and additional leverage provided by the 10’4” length – mean than single-hand anglers can drop their fly on the far bank without special superpowers and still be able to mend effectively. The rod’s tip isn’t feeble – it’ll pick up tons of line and a large indicator without issue. Bead anglers in Salmon Land: this is your new rod. Anglers with lots of backcast room will be pleased; the OHS’s action is designed to perform as well overhead as it does with water-loaded casts. The rod received a single-hand rating to minimize confusion, so the #7 loads with a regular #7 line while overhead casting.

In two-hand mode, the OHS allows double-hand anglers to tuck into tighter quarters than one would be able to with a standard switch-length rod. This ‘middlin’ length is unique in the industry and is a true happy-medium between a long single-hand rod and a two-hander. Efficient swinging, skating, and indicator fishing are all possible while in two-hand mode. The rod’s backbone doesn’t scoff at heavy tips and will turn over as much T-material as your head can handle.

Cheers,

Tyler Justice Allen | Marketing/Pro Team Manager”

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Here is a fine winter steelhead tube fly.

Here is a fine winter steelhead tube fly.

Thanks Tyler.

I feel confident that anyone who picks up this OHS rod will find it perfectly suited to steelhead (winter and summer) while fishing a wide range of conditions.

Jay Nicholas, winter season 2016/2017

Post Script: for a report on whether or not I ever caught a steelhead on this rod and if so how did the 7 wt. OHS manage the poser of a winter steelhead—you’ll have to check out my WordPress Blog fishingwithjay.

Posted in Fly Fishing Gear Review | 1 Comment

IF4 coming to Eugene April 19

The International Fly Fishing Film Festival is a collection of professionally made fly fishing videos from around the globe that highlight the beauty and culture of fly fishing. This is an exciting night of watching the fly fishing films, and raffling off over $5000 in great fishing gear, art, and trips donated by some of the best retailers and guides in the business.

IF4™ 2017 – Tickets On Sale Now! from IF4™ on Vimeo.

Wildish Community Theater | April 19, 2017
Doors open at 6:15 PM. Film begins AT 7:00 PM.
Hosted By: True West Custom Fly Rods, Caddis Fly Shop and Homewaters Fly Shop
Funds raised from this event will benefit Fly Fishing Colloborative.
Tickets will also be available for $15.00 at: Caddis Fly Shop & Home Waters Fly Shop and if available, for $18.00 at the door on the day of the event.
Buy tickets online here
For more information, please contact event organizer at info@flyfilmfest.com

Posted in Oregon Fly Fishing Clubs and Events | Leave a comment

Jigged Possie Bugger Fly Tying Video

In this instructional fly tying video Tony Torrence demonstrates how to tie the Jigged Possie Bugger. The Possie Bugger is quite possibly the most popular nymph pattern in our area; hopper-dropper, indicator, or Euro style fly fishing, the fly always produces. If you have Caddis in your local waters, give the Jigged Possie Bugger a try and hold on tight.

JIgged Possie Bugger

Jigged Possie Bugger

Thread: Veevus 10/0, Brown
Hook: TMC C400BL or Daichi 4647 sizes 8-16; size 12 in video
Bead: Gold Slotted Tungsten Bead; size 1/8 in video
Weight: Lead Wire 3-4 wraps; 0.015 in video
Tail: Ozzie Possum fur piece-Natural and Pearl Flashabou
Rib: Pearl Flashabou
Counter-rib: Small Copper Ultra Wire
Abdomen: Wapsi Awesome Possum Dubbing
Hackle: Partridge
Thorax: Black Hareline Dubbin

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Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

Flame Boss Steelhead Tube Fly with Jay Nicholas

Flame Boss Tube Fly by Jay Nicholas - 2017

Flame Boss Tube Fly by Jay Nicholas – 2017

Here is a tube fly version of a fly pattern that I fished on traditional hooks for years extending back into the 1970s. The Flame Boss is a variation of the Boss Fly probably developed on the coastal rivers of Northern California back in the period of the 1920s – 1950s.  These flies were deadly then are still deadly in the modern age of Intruders and the like.

I hope to feature more traditional patterns tied on tubes this season – because I think they offer advantages over the same pattern tied on very large traditional hooks.

May you enjoy tying and fishing these flies.

I will note that this fly is tied in the video on Medium size Classic Tube and does not require a hook guide. This is the case because I rig the up-eye trailer hook on a mono loop and pull the knot into the tube to secure it. This is one means of rigging these flies that is a little different from using micro or nano tubes with hook guards or 40/40 tubes that have a hook guard incorporated into  the tube.

Here goes . . . . .

Tube: Pro Sportfisher Nano Tube or medium classic tube
Hook Guide: Orange large
Hook option: I show a Gamakatsu up-eye #2  hook in the video but you could also use an Owner #2 straight eye or OPST Swing hook #2 if you tie the fly on a microtube, nano tube, or 40/40 tube
Tail: Pro Sportfisher Marble Fox, black
Wing: Pro Sportfisher Marble Fox, cream or white
Hackle: Hot Orange or black Schlappen or marabou
Cone: Pro Sportfisher Ultra Sonic Disc Gunsmoke Metallic – large

If you are a traditionalist and want to transfer a fly pattern to a tube I reommend this as a nice place to start.

Jay Nicholas – winter season 2016/17

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