Long Grizzly Saddles in stock now – August 2015

Long Grizzly Saddle patches in stock now.

Long Grizzly Saddle patches in stock now.

Yes, on August 3, 2015, the Caddis Fly Angling Shop has a very good supply of excellent grizzly saddles at very reasonable prices (most at $49.95). These make for excellent dry flies, buggers and wonderful wings on Intruders. Many of the flies featured in Intruder Essentials call for nice grizzly saddles, and these fit the recipe nicely.

Long Grizzly Saddles for dry flies, buggers, and Intruders.

Long Grizzly Saddles for dry flies, buggers, and Intruders.

These are long narrow saddles and in my opinion a great value.  We have other saddles in stock now also, so any questions would be gladly answered if you call or email.  We will be getting more.  Maybe.  Sometime.  I hope.  Just a thought.

Chris Daughters

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Darn nearly a Mini Intruder (Purple /Blue) featuring OPST shank

This is a nice little fly that caught winter steelhead for me, and it is one that you will have fun tying and adapting to your own style if you give it a go.

I have concentrated on tying and fishing Intruder style flies for about six months now, a drop in the bucket of people who have tied and fished these flies for decades, but we all must follow our own tying evolution in the order we may. Late to the party, yes. But when I go in I go all in, and while this fly does not meet my new criteria as a real Intruder, still it is an effective fly and will often elicit more solid takes than a much larger fly.

Achieving a distinct thorax and butt section on a fly is one thing if the fly is 4” long, but it is far more difficult to achieve if the fly is only 2.5” long.

Intruder Essentials Cover

Intruder Essentials Cover

I invite you to check out Intruder Essentials to see how I define the Intruder and a showcase of two dozen of my original Intruders. Trey Combs wrote a wonderful Foreword to this book, and If you are a person who likes to have something tangible beside you at the fly bench, this will be a good reference, I dearly hope. Meanwhile, enjoy yourself indoors and on the water, stay safe, and look to the future.

Jay Nicholas

Eyes: Omit from this small fly
Shank: OPST
Wire: Senyos Intruder Wire or #30 Fireline
Hook: Gamakatsu Octopus
Butt: ProSportfisher American Possum, Kingfisher blue
Body: Pearl Diamond Braid, Root beer
Thorax: Extra Select Bright Purple Marabou
Thorax enhancer: Mirage lateral Flash
Wings: Blue grizzly saddle feathers (call or email shop for availability)
Thorax finish: Orange Grizzly or Guinea ex select marabou

 

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Articulated Baitfish Intruder Fly

Here is our all purpose articulated fly, fish it for salmon, giant trout, steelhead, pike, musky, bass, and gators.

Here is our all purpose articulated fly – fish it for salmon, giant trout, steelhead, pike, musky, bass, and gators.

This here is what I consider a really cool articulated fly that may or may not qualify for the genre of Intruder, depending on your tastes.  I cooked up this beauty while working on Intruder Essentials, but decided that it did not make my evolving increasingly rigorous definition, so it hit the cutting room floor.  Sad but true and too good a fly and material combination to let it languish on the hard drive.

So, for your viewing and tying pleasure, and to show you the kinds of things one may do creating a fly that one could fish for steelhead, salmon, pike, bass or even musky if you are brave enough.

I have not had the opportunity to fish this fly yet, but it is in my den waiting for just the right opportunity, and I’m confident that it will catch fish if given half a chance.

Enjoy.

Jay Nicholas, June 2015

I’ll  only note a few of the key materials, because this fly tying process is one that begs for creativity and substitution.

Shank
Wire
EP Minnow Head Brush
Senyo’s Chromatic Brush
Hareline Barred Ostrich
Balzeyes
Senyo’s Laser Dub

Senyo's Minnow Head Brush makes a great butt.

EP Minnow Head Brush for the butt.

Add bulk with this 3" EP Rootbeer brush.

Add bulk with this 3″ EP Rootbeer brush.

Throw on some Ostrich.

Throw on some Ostrich.

Lash it in all around the shank.

Lash it in all around the shank.

Add some flash.

Add some flash.

Wind on another neutral color minnow head brush.

Wind on another neutral color minnow head brush.

The rear segment of the articulated fly is done after you whip finish and cement.

The rear segment of the articulated fly is done after you whip finish and cement.

after slippng the rear segment of the fly into the front shank, secure the front shank in the vise/

after slippng the rear segment of the fly into the front shank, secure the front shank in the vise.

Wind Senyo's Chromatic Live bait 3" brush at rear of front shank.

Wind Senyo’s Chromatic Live bait 3″ brush at rear of front shank.

Add a bright color brush now.

Add a bright color brush now.

lash on some Hareline barred Ostrich plume now.

lash on some Hareline barred Ostrich plume now.

Time for Grizzly saddle wings if you have any, or omit if you do not.

Time for Grizzly saddle wings if you have any, or omit if you do not.

Throw on Senyo's Laser Dub to finish the head in front of the barbell eyes.

Throw on Senyo’s Laser Dub to finish the head in front of the barbell eyes.

Looking good.

Looking good.

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Limeade Nymph Fly Tying Video

Chris Scott demonstrates how to tie his Limeade mayfly nymph. The Limeade is a versatile mayfly nymph pattern that works well under a dry fly or deep coupled with a heavier nymph closer to the river bottom.

limeaid-nymph

Limeade Nymph

Hook: 2457 #14
Bead: Tungsten 7/64 Gold Tungsten
Thread: White GSP 100
Tail: Brown Hackle Fibers
Body: Mix of Golden Brown and Caddis Green Ice dub
Rib: Small Chartreuse Ultra Wire
Thorax: UV Ice dub Pearl
Wingcase: Pheasant Tail

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The Caddis Fly Celebrates 40 Years in Business with a Huge SALE!

caddisstickerround

caddis fly sale shot

This Saturday August 1st we celebrate 40 years in business with a massive SALE at the shop. Everything will be on sale. Stay tuned for more specifics, but be sure to set aside a bit of shopping time this coming Saturday.

caddis log

Posted in Shop Sales and Specials | 1 Comment

Middle Fork of the Willamette Gets a Refresher

middle fork of the willamette summer 2015 water levels

Fishing has picked up considerably on the Middle Fork of the Willamette near Oakridge. The graph above shows a spike in flows exiting Hills Creek Dam. This cold water influx has the fish looking up for larger attractor and terrestrial dries, and eating many of your standard nymphs. The river is not to high to wade by any means, and is fishing best in the early a.m and afternoon evenings. Despite the forecast for heat this coming week the Middle Fork is one of your best bets locally.

middle-fork-willamette-fly-fishing

middle-fork-willamette-stonefly-nymph

middle-fork-willamette-fly-fishing

middle-fork-willamette-fly-fishing

middle-fork-willamette-fly-fishing

Best fly pattern are:
Double Dutch Bug
Chubby Chernobyl
Parachute Adams
Ramsey’s Goofball
Patriot Parawulff
HDA Fav Variant Jig
Possie Bugger
Jigged Prince

In response to the heat we are now offering half day guided trips to capitalize on the best conditions each day. Please call the shop to inquire 541-342-7005.

CD

Posted in Fishing Reports, Middle Fork Willamette River fishing | 1 Comment

Pink Fuego Nymph Fly Tying Video

Chris Scott shares his go to “searching” mayfly nymph pattern in the video above. Tie this fly off of a mid sized dry fly or go deep with a double nymph rig. It works year round.

pink-fuego-nymph

Pink Fuego Nymph

Hook: 2457 #14
Bead: Tungsten 7/64 Gold Tungsten
Thread: Danvilles Flat waxed shrimp pink -Second thread Veevus GSP 100 White
Body Danville Flat waxed shrimp pink
Tail: Brown Hackle fibers
Wing case: Pheasant Tail
Thorax: UV Ice dub Pearl

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Crane Prairie 2015

Crane 4

It was one of those great Cascade moments on Crane this week.  Crane was flat and the reflection on the lake made it seem like a Monet painting.   Ok, enough of spirituality and painters….it was a great day for fishing.  We knew we were pressing our  luck after a great outing on East Lake, but on this day, we should have purchased lottery tickets.  We had a winning day on Crane.

Crane 6

Ken hit the score board first with a Carey Special and a Sci Angler Stillwater intermediate sinking line.  BTW, blue wing damsels were all over the place! 

Crane 3

I was using a Thin Mint with the new Rio Intouch Hover line.   It was an interesting contrast as we had two lines deep and one near the surface.  All lines produced, which made us think we just hit the right column in the water to find the fish.

Crane 5Crane 2

Our fishing was best in the afternoon.  We used a slow troll technique which proved to be quite productive.  We again, had to seek shelter, while a “shower” passed.  Seemed like the bite was a bit slower after the shower, but we really didn’t care.    Mother nature gave us a show with the “showers” and good fishing.    Lake fishing should continue to produce on Crane as the fish are back in the channels.   Get out there! Crane 1

 

Posted in Central Oregon Fishing Report, Eastern Oregon, Fishing Reports | Leave a comment

Super Simple Albacore Fly Instructional

Simple and effective Albacore fly to troll or cast.

Simple and effective Albacore fly to troll or cast.

It is only just July on the Oregon Coast, but it is not too soon to get geared and flied up for Albacore, because they could be here any day now.  Other effective tuna flies are in my book, SEA Flies, available on Amazon or at your local fly shop or as a personalized copy if you contact me through the blog. This is a very simple fly to tie and is very effective as well.  The principle components of this pattern are:

EP Senyo’s Chromatic Brush Live Bait
Farrar’s Blend (bucktail white, dark green, herring back, bonze back, rainbow, etc)
Hareline Holographic Eyes (5/16 or larger)
Clear Cure Goo (tack free squeeze)
Gamakatsu SC 15 2H (sizes 2/0 – 4/0)

Here is a step by step visual of this fly’s creation.

I use mono thread for tying most of my albacore baitfish flies.

I use mono thread for tying most of my albacore baitfish flies.

I wrapped on three turns of EP Senyo's live bait Chromatic Brush to make the belly of this fly.

I wrapped on three turns of EP Senyo’s live bait Chromatic Brush to make the belly of this fly.

Now lash on  a sparse layer of buck tail white or pale belly color of your choosing.

Now lash on a sparse layer of buck tail white or pale belly color of your choosing.

Here, I am about to add a layer of green and blue to top the fly.

Here, I am about to add a layer of green and blue to top the fly.

Tie in 6-10 strands of multi color Kyrstal Flash to top the back of this fly.

Tie in 6-10 strands of multi color Kyrstal Flash to top the back of this fly.

Time to add the eyes, just gentle pressure to place them before adding Cure Goo.

Time to add the eyes, just gentle pressure to place them before adding Cure Goo.

Fill in the gap between the eyes top and bottom of fly with Cure Goo.

Fill in the gap between the eyes top and bottom of fly with Cure Goo.

Gooing the underside gap between eyes.

Gooing the underside gap between eyes.

Done!  We could fancy up this fly with Lateral Scale flash and Fluoro Fibre throat, but as shown here, this fly is a tuna catcher.

Done! We could fancy up this fly with Lateral Scale flash and Fluoro Fibre throat, but as shown here, this fly is a tuna catcher.

 Hope you find this interesting, and I know from experience that this simple fly catches Albacore tuna.

Jay Nicholas July 2015

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Nautilus Reels

P1350373

Prior to going Cuba, Jim T. and I had the opportunity to swing by Nautilus Reels in Miami, Florida.  Kristen Mustad was available to give us a tour.   “Made in the USA” really means something when you see the manufacturing capabilities of this outstanding fly reel company.

Seventh generation metal mechanics manufacturers that have been in the fishing industry for all seven generations, Nautilus Reels emerges from 6x grandchildren of Ole Mustad, founder of O. Mustad & Søn — a metal mechanics company founded in 1832 in Norway.

The Mustad family has a history of impassioned dedication to the development of revolutionary technologies for the production of small metal parts and the redesigning of existing products and processes to make them more efficient and effective.  Our tour  through the Nautilus Reels factory revealed this history is in full effect now, as Nautilus continues to to improve reel parts for increased function, strength, and weight.

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CNC machines, programmed to cut raw aluminum bars into individual rounds to be fully machined into reels, abound in the Nautilus facility.

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Recognizing the significance of the environment.  Nautilus reels places a heavy emphasis on recycling all of its machining waste.   

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We fly anglers have a propensity for asking that “special color” be available and Kristen has stepped up to the challenge by providing very striking custom colors.

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We were very impressed with the assembly, repair, and packaging area.  Yes, all in the same room!  

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Having visited a few suppliers in a previous career, the real measure of product reliability or quality often lies in the percentage of defective product or customer returns.  I asked the question, “So, show me your repair or return area.”  Kirsten smiled and pointed to the above picture.  “That’s it!”  It seems that small stack of a dozen or so boxes was the returns for about a month.   Bottom line;  Very few Nautilus reels come back.   Jim and I took three Nautilus reels to Cuba and all worked flawlessly.

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Laser printing is done in the same area as well as repairs.

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Nautilus fly reels are one of the finest reels made and are the product of 180 years of family tradition, innovation, and excellence. 

During our visit we could understand how the employees are amplified by passion, family tradition, and tons of experience with machinery.  Experience, Tradition and Excellence are the banners held high in a company that prides itself in producing very innovative and cutting edge designs for fly reels.  Kristen shared new designs on paper of what products are in the pipeline  from Nautilus….stay tuned…

Thanks to Kristen, Jesus, and all of the employees we met.  Made in USA and “Tested on Animals”…yep, we understand it now!

P1350416

Posted in Fly Fishing Gear Review | 1 Comment

ODFW Takes Action to Help Native Fish

From the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Website

Thursday, July 16, 2015

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has curtailed fishing hours on most of Oregon’s rivers to avoid additional stress on native fish already suffering from high water temperatures and low stream flows from this year’s drought.

Effective Saturday, July 18, and until further notice, all waterbodies defined as streams in the 2015 Oregon Sportfishing Regulations are closed above tidewater (where applicable) to fishing for trout, salmon, steelhead and sturgeon from 2 p.m. to one hour before sunrise.

Angling for these species will be prohibited at all times in the Willamette River downstream of Willamette Falls, including the Clackamas River up to the Interstate 205 Bridge, the Multnomah Channel and the Gilbert River. The following sections of the John Day River will also have complete closures: The mainstem of the John Day River above Indian Creek near Prairie City; the Middle Fork of the John Day River above Mosquito Creek near the town of Galena; the North Fork of the John Day River above Desolation Creek and Desolation Creek.

Some streams will remain open for angling under normal hours because they are less prone to high water temperature risks due to springs, tides, cold water releases from some dams and high elevations.

Streams that will remain open for angling under normal hours are:

Northeast Zone:

The Wallowa River above Sunrise Road; Lostine River above Pole Bridge Campground; Prairie Creek; Hurricane Creek; Spring Creek; and all streams within the Eagle Cap Wilderness Area.

Southeast Zone:

The Malheur River and its tributaries; the Owyhee River below the Owyhee Reservoir; and the Blitzen River and its tributaries above Page Springs Weir and Bridge Creek.
The Klamath River and its tributaries.

Central Zone:

The Deschutes River above Macks Canyon; the Metolius River; the Fall River; the Crooked River (from mouth to Bowman Dam); and Tumalo Creek.
The Hood River and its tributaries and the White River and its tributaries.

Willamette Zone:

The McKenzie River and its tributaries; the Middle Fork of the Willamette River below Dexter Dam; the Middle Fork of the Willamette River and its tributaries above Lookout Point Reservoir; and Alton Baker Canoe Canal.
The mainstem of the South Santiam River below Foster Dam; Quartzville Creek; the North Santiam River above Detroit Lake; and the Breitenbush River.

Southwest Zone:

The mainstem Rogue River from Fishers Ferry upstream to William Jess Dam and all tributaries upstream of the William Jess Dam and Lost Creek Reservoir.

In addition to the statewide fishing restrictions, a hearing is scheduled for 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 16 via teleconference to discuss curtailment of recreational catch-and-release sturgeon fishing upstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River.

“Earlier this month, we indicated that if these drought conditions continued, we may have to close or restrict some fisheries,” said Mike Gauvin, ODFW’s recreation fisheries manager. “These are difficult, but necessary actions to protect native fish already suffering from extreme drought conditions.”

“This doesn’t mean that all fishing has to stop.” According to Gauvin, most streams will still be open in the early hours when water temperatures are cool, and there are many great fishing opportunities in lakes, reservoirs for hatchery stocked rainbow trout, warmwater fish like, smallmouth bass or crappie, as well as all of the ocean fisheries.

“As extreme weather events become more frequent due to climate change, we need to be prepared for the stress these conditions will have on fish, wildlife and their habitats,” Ed Bowles, Fish Division Administrator said. “Planning for the effects of these changing climatic conditions presents a unique challenge for us, yet we are committed to doing our best to enhance resiliency to climate change and avoid significant impacts on our natural resources.”

ODFW already implemented emergency regulations on several other rivers. In addition, trout stocking schedules and locations have been adjusted and some hatchery fish have been released early as a result of high water temperatures. Elevated water temperatures have led to salmon, steelhead, and sturgeon deaths in several rivers.
Gauvin encourages the public to report sightings of stranded fish, or other wildlife distressed by drought, to the department and to take precautions when fishing during these drought conditions.

On days when temperatures soar, anglers can do their part to reduce the stress on fish by adopting the following measures:

Fish early in day when water temperatures are cooler.
Use a thermometer to check water temperatures frequently. Stop fishing when temperatures exceed 70 degrees.
Consider changing locations to high elevation lakes or shaded streams near headwaters. These places are often cooler.
Use barbless hooks so you can release fish easily without harming them.
Use the appropriate gear and land fish quickly. The longer the fight, the less likely the fish will survive.
Keep the fish in the water when you unhook it and cradle the fish upright until it revives enough to swim away.
Use your judgement. If conditions where you want to fish seem especially severe (low, hot water), consider fishing somewhere else where water conditions are better.
Check the regulation update pages on the ODFW website before you head out to make sure temporary emergency regulations have not been put in place for the waters you want to fish.

Posted in Fishing Reports, Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

East Lake Report 2015

East 3You might ask “Why is this guy smiling?” Headed out with Ken C. and Steve JL to East Lake this week. Steve had never been to East Lake. Ken and I knew the callibaetis hatch would still be going on. We were not disappointed. Dry flies were the key to success and the Callibaetis Cripple was the top producer. East 2

Ken and I hit into some nice browns and we both missed huge strikes at our flies.  Basically the fish cannonballed our flies!  I missed mine completely and Ken was rewarded with a straighten hook.

East 1

Something to watch out for this time of year…”a slight chance of rain showers”….translation…its going to pound rain, accompanied by thunder and lightning! We figured, metal boat, graphite rods, yep, might be a good idea to seek shelter and wait for it to blow past. Except, the darn fish kept rising!

East 4

There is no need to adjust your monitor, it got that dark while we waited out the “shower”. Great trip to East. Many rainbows to hand in addition to browns above. We discussed where we would go the next day. We would test our humility, and head for Crane Prairie.

Posted in Eastern Oregon, Fishing Reports, Oregon High Lakes | Leave a comment

Protect Wild Rivers & Native Fish from Strip Mining

From the Native Fish Society:

Mining companies want to develop nickel strip mines in the delicate headwaters of the Smith, Illinois, Pistol rivers and Hunter Creek. These headwaters play a critical role in providing the cold, clean water necessary to support the wild, native fish that call these watersheds home. Despite overwhelming opposition, the archaic 1872 Mining Law prioritizes mining over all other land uses!

Illinois River

Thanks to the leadership of Senator Wyden and Senator Merkley and Representative DeFazio of Oregon and Representative Huffman of California, the Interior Department is considering a proposal to protect these wild rivers and their native fish by temporarily withdrawing them from mining while Congress considers legislation—the Southwestern Oregon Watershed and Salmon Protection Act—for more lasting protection.

What’s at stake?

The Wild and Scenic North Fork Smith River
Baldface Creek
Rough and Ready Creek
The headwaters of Hunter Creek and Pistol River

The Interior Department is taking comments on the proposed mineral withdrawal now. Please join us in sending a letter of support. It’s the best way to protect the crystal clear, salmon-studded waters of these wild rivers from damaging pollution.

Click here to take action.

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

Support for O & C Lands Act Needed Now

Last week, in a surprising about-face, Oregon county commissioners turned their backs on the hard work Oregon residents and their delegation have put into crafting a balanced bill to deal with issues on the O & C Lands Act.

Wilderness

Instead of supporting Senator Wydens well balance bill, they supported a bill written by Wyoming’s Sen. John Barrasso, a timber-focused bill that only addresses the harvest side of the equation, watering down important protections that have been in place for decades.

For months, our delegation has been working to find the right balance between timber harvest and protection for our land and water. And after taking input across the board, they came up with a workable solution – one everyone signed on to because it was a local solution that came from local people.

It’s time our commissioners look at the bigger picture and support the legislation that came from their own constituents — not something authored by a Senator in a state that doesn’t understand timber or the impacts of timber harvest the way Oregon does.

I urge you to contact your county commissioner and let them know how you feel about the “Barrasso bill”, and contact Sen. Wyden’s office in Eugene or Portland and thank the senator and his staff for their efforts on finding a balanced approach on O & C forest lands.

Chris Daughters

Contact Sen. Ron Wyden here: https://www.wyden.senate.gov/contact/
In Eugene here:
405 East 8th Ave., Suite 2020
Eugene, OR, 97401
tel (541) 431-0229

In Portland here:
911 NE 11th Ave., Suite 630
Portland, OR, 97232
tel (503) 326-7525

Also, you can send a message to the BLM here about the plan. Comments to the BLM are due by July 23rd.

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

Warm Water Temperatures in Western Waters

It’s only early July and low warm water is a hot topic for most western waters. Below are a couple of links to the latest information we have seen. Additionally a graph indicating “Healthy Trout Water Temperatures”. Stay tuned to OregonFlyFishingBlog.com for upcoming posts on the best waters to be fishing in order to avoid low and warm water.

http://www.oregonlive.com/sports/oregonian/bill_monroe/index.ssf/2015/06/post_181.html

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2015/06/more_fish_likely_to_die_as_hig.html

water temps

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment