Writers on the Fly – The Cascadia Tour 2017

Join our favorite fly fishing author Chris Santella and many more fantastic creators for Writers on the Fly. Events can be seen in both Bend and Portland. Check out the entire schedule at this link.
http://www.syzygyflyfishing.com/the-cascadia-tour.

Anatomy of a Fishing Story from Jason Rolfe on Vimeo.

When: Wednesday November 15, 2017 @7 PM
Where: Migrating Brewing Annex at 2828 NE Glisan Street
Why: To celebrate literature and art inspired by flyfishing
How (much): Tickets are $10

Posted in Fly Fishing Books | Leave a comment

ECHO Bad Ass Glass Fly Rod Review – November 2017

ECHO BAG and EPR fly rods with a nice catch of Pacific Albacore in Pacific City.

ECHO BAG and EPR fly rods with a nice catch of Pacific Albacore in Pacific City.

As a total aside, the reels I’ve been fishing with the ECHO BAG and EPR include the
*Nautilus
*Hatch 11 Plus
Both are SUPER FINE – TOUGH – DEPENDABLE fly reels. Note please that I was fishing olcer models of these reels than I have linked to – the old reels still work just fine and I’m sure that the new reels will perform as well if not better.

ECHO Bad Ass Glass fly rod review: I will start by noting that I’ve had a modest level of practical experience with several ECHO fly rods that you could consider power house rods. When I say this I mean fly rods that I would fish for hard-pulling species. Some of these rods accommodate finesse casting, some accommodate chuck-and-duck casting.

The fly rods I’m using as a comparative base include the following:
*Sage Xi3
*Sage Salt
*Sage One
*Sage X
*Winston B2x
*Winston B3x
*Winston B3x lus
*Scott Radian
*Echo Boost
*Echo 3 SW
*Echo Prime
*Echo EPR
*Echo BAG Bad Ass Glass
I will note here that I found all of these fly rods performed well enough, not one of these broke or failed me in any way when put under severe strain. The price points of these rods range from under 300 to over 800 bucks. The finish components of these rods is obviously very different with the higher priced rods outfit with the best reel seats, best guides, and nicest rod tubes.

Things get crazy when you are offshore fishing for Albacore.

Things get crazy when you are offshore fishing for Albacore.

When I say that all of these rods performed well enough here is what I mean. As a caster of intermediate skill, I am able to present my fly at a modest fishing distance in the bracket of 50 – 80 ft. All of these rods will also present a fly in the 20 – 50 ft range.

This might seem like a crazy way to introduce a fly rod review, but I’m a little crazy so why the heck not. One issue I have with fly rod reviews in general is that they may leave the impression that the subject of the review is the one and only fly rod that merits endorsement of any kind. I decided to start this review with a very general overview of the BAG:

You can not possibly go wrong with the ECHO Bad Ass Glass fly rod if you want a rod that is
*fantastically strong
*bends super deep into the cork
*looks so hot that it literally shines on the water
*will cast fly lines in a huge grain weight range
*is saltwater resistant
*will execute casts with floating and fast sinking fly lines
*executes casts as short as 20 ft and as long as 60 ft with a 450 gr fast sink fly line
*will probably execute longer distance casts with the right fly line, especially by a better caster
*capable of delivering a huge smile factor on the part of the fly rod user

 

ECHO Bad Ass Glass in the grass in Pacific City.

ECHO Bad Ass Glass in the grass in Pacific City.

Here you go: a nice photo and rod specs for the ECHO Bad Ass Glass fly rod.

Here you go: a nice photo and rod specs for the ECHO Bad Ass Glass fly rod.

This is my brief review of the ECHO Bad Ass Glass fly rod. My written remarks in this post include the reaction of my friend Jack Harrell. Jack fished the 10 wt. for Pacific albacore and I fished the 12 wt. for albacore a few weeks later.

This screen shot from my Go Pro shows the BAG under heavy strain. Unfortunately, my camera was aimed poorly, so the video is nearly a total waste. Big Sigh.

This screen shot from my Go Pro shows the BAG under heavy strain. Unfortunately, my camera was aimed poorly, so the video is nearly a total waste. Big Sigh.

 

Several very nice Pacific albacore that tested the ECHO Bad Ass Glass and EPR fly rods, both in 12 wts.

Several very nice Pacific albacore that tested the ECHO Bad Ass Glass and EPR fly rods, both in 12 wts.

Bad Ass Glass under strain offshore Pacific City.

Bad Ass Glass and Hatch fly reel under strain offshore Pacific City.

My deepest thanks to my friends Kevin and Ed for getting me offshore (Kevin's dory; Ed's tuna processing; Kevin and Ed's time and effort preparing the dory to fish ad cleaning it up after the trip while I napped and tried to recover from the pounding we took in a rough ocean).

My deepest thanks to my friends Kevin and Ed for getting me offshore (Kevin’s dory; Ed’s tuna processing; Kevin and Ed’s time and effort preparing the dory to fish and cleaning it up after the trip while I napped and tried to recover from the pounding we took in a rough ocean).

The albacore we tussled with this year are large, with many over 30 pounds. These big fish put the strain on our tackle and these ECHO fly rods were up to the challenge of pressuring tuna and getting us back in the water so we could try to catch another.

Jack and I are both impressed with this fly rod and recommend it very highly.

Not much strain in the rod here because the darn tuna was rushing our dory!

Not much strain in the rod here because the darn tuna was rushing our dory!

 

Official AIRFLO line recommendations.

Official AIRFLO line recommendations.

 AIRFLO line recommendations are shown above.

I fished the
SA Sonic 25 Sink 350 – 450 gr
AIRFLO Depth Finder Big Game 400 – 500 gr
RIO Outbound 10 wt (425 gr)
All of these are good fly line choices.

In closing, let’s look at the following rod chart from ECHO.

this shows the EPR as the fastest most powerful rod in the ECHO quiver, and the BAG is mid range in both power and speed. Here is my take home on this analysis. The EPR will be a superior rod for the angler who is seeking line speed, distance, accuracy and lifting strength in a fly rod. TH

The BAG will be an excellent choice for the angler of beginner and intermediate casting skill level (as well as the most experienced caster) because the glass rod will tolerate a very wide range of casting strokes and fly line weights.

if I were to note one down-side of the Bad Ass Glass rod in the 10 wt and 12 wt fly rods – this is it: The rod is heavier in hand than a fly rod like the EPR, the Sage Salt, or the Winston BIIIX, or the Scott Meridian. All of these fly rods are fast action graphite or composite fly rods that are engineered to be very light and generate very high line speeds.

If you are looking for a rod that will deliver the fastest line speeds, the greatest casting accuracy, and be the lightest in hand for making hundreds of casts in a day, I would recommend the ECHO EPR or another high-end fly rod.

This ECHO chart reveals the power versus action matrix for the range of single hand fly rods

This ECHO chart reveals the power versus action matrix for the range of single hand fly rods.

Posted in Fly Fishing Gear Review | Leave a comment

RIO’s new HOW TO VIDEO. “How to make an Overhead Cast”

Check out some great basic tips in this new video from Rio Fly Lines.

S2 E1. How to Make an Overhead Cast from RIO Products on Vimeo.

Posted in Oregon Fly Fishing Tips | Leave a comment

Nicholas’ Marabou Steelhead Tube – Purple/Blue/Black

Nicholas' Marabou Steelhead Tube Fly (black/blue/purple)

Nicholas’ Marabou Steelhead Tube Fly (black/blue/purple)

This is another very effective steelhead fly pattern—tied on a Pro Sportfisher Classic Tube—one that I have caught summer and winter steelhead on. Like Jeff Hickman’s Fish Taco Series, these simple tube flies are not weighted.

Un-weighted tubes will fish the softest water on the inside and at the hang down position, the places where we often get the steelhead’s grab.

Here are the basic ingredients for this pattern

Thread – Veevus 8/0 black
Preferred cement – Brush on Lok Tite
Tube Mandrel – Pro Sportfisher Flexineedle, large
Tube – Pro Sportfisher Classic Tube (med fl. Blue)
Butt – Senyo’s Fusion Dub Pink Lady
Butt Collar – Purple Schlappen
Butt Horns – Blue MFC Premium Plume Ostrich
First Collar – Fish Hunter Marabou Spey Blood Quills, Silver Doctor Blue
Flash – holographic pink #6988 Flashabou
Second Collar – Fish Hunter Marabou Spey Blood Quills, Black
Cone – Pro Sportfisher Metallic Purple Ultrasonic Disc, medium

The hook for this tube fly  should be rigged on a loop, with the knot pulled into the rear of the tube. By precise adjustment of the loop size, you will be able to place the hook as close or as far back from the body of the fly as you wish.

I have had fun with this fly —  it’s general color cast, size, and materials are all proven to be attractive to summer and winter steelhead.

Jay Nicholas, Autumn 2017

Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

JUSTIN’S CHOPPER SCULPIN FLY TYING VIDEO

In this video Justin Helm demonstrates how to tie his “Chopper Sculpin”. The “Chopper” fishes anywhere trout swim, it’s a great mix of some classic and highly effective patterns… muddler, Galloup Sex Dungeon, Whitlock Sculpin and more. Fish it on a floating line or sink tip, swung or with action.

thumbnail

JUSTIN’S CHOPPER SCULPIN

Hook: Gamakatsu B10S Stinger (Size 2)
Gills: Spey Blood Quill Marabou Dyed Dark Olive
Hackle: Schlappen 5-7″ black
Head: Spinning Deer Hair (Natural Whitetail)
Tail: Black Barred Rabbit Strips Olive Variant
Eyes: Double Pupil Lead Eyes Medium (Yellow w/White & Black Pupil)
Body: Speckled Chenille (Copper/Black)
Thread: Veevus 150 Denier GSP Thread (White)
Rib: Brassie Wire

Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

Help Free the Klamath River

From the Oregon Council of Trout Unlimited – Please Take Action today.

A landmark agreement has paved the way for removal of four dams on the Klamath River, historically the third largest producer of salmon and steelhead on the West Coast. Now, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission must approve the next critical step in the dam decommissioning process.

1. Please submit your comments to FERC supporting transfer of dam license from PacifiCorp to the Klamath River Renewal Corporation.

2. Share this email with your fishing partners.

3.Make a donation to support TU’s campaign to restore the Klamath River.

Why We Care

Four aging power dams on the Klamath River are scheduled for removal in 2020, the result of a collaborative agreement crafted by a diverse group of stakeholders. Supporters include the current dam owner PacifiCorp, the states of California and Oregon, the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, the Yurok and Karuk tribes, and the conservation groups American Rivers, California Trout, Northern California Council of the Federation of Fly Fishers, Klamath RiverKeeper, Salmon River Restoration Council, Sustainable Northwest, and Trout Unlimited.
The fate of these dams now lies with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the federal agency responsible for hydropower projects. At this time FERC must decide whether to approve a petition to transfer the dam license from PacifiCorp to the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC), the entity responsible for decommissioning the dams. The transfer of license must be approved for the settlement to go forward.
The signed agreement was a huge step in the right direction. We won’t let the Klamath Dams continue to degrade the river, fish, and water quality. FERC has opened a formal public comment period on this proposed transfer of license — the time to act is now to make our voice heard.

What You Can Do

This is our golden opportunity to restore wild steelhead and salmon on the West Coast. The Klamath River was once the third largest producer of salmon on the West Coast, behind Columbia and Sacramento rivers. Let’s bring it back.

How to submit your comments to FERC:

1. Go to www.ferconline.ferc.gov/QuickComment.aspx. (If you’d like to submit by mail, use address below. Include docket # P-2082-062 and P-14803-000 in letter.)
2. Enter your information including e-mail. Open automatic e-mail from FERC, follow link from there to submit comment.
3. In the docket field, enter first # P-2082-062, then select the proper docket offered by FERC, confirm that selection, then enter P-14803-000 and repeat the process to specify the project on which you are commenting.
4. Fill in comment form using our sample letter (see below) or your own. Personal stories are always a good touch.

Comments must be submitted to FERC by November 6th. Thank you for your help!

Sample Letter
Kimberly Bose, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
888 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20426

Re: Docket # P-2082-062 and P-14803-000

Dear Secretary Bose,

I support the transfer of the PacifiCorp Hydropower Project to the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC). This will advance the removal of the four aging dams on the Klamath River — JC Boyle, Copco No. 1, Copco No. 2, and Iron Gate.

Since 1917, the four Klamath Dams have blocked access to hundreds of miles of productive habitat for salmon and steelhead. The dams have diminished the productivity of the river, prevented anadromous fish from reaching their spawning grounds, and starved the lower river of cold source water. Beyond loss of habitat, Iron Gate Dam now serves as a giant heat sink that creates water quality problems, including toxic algae blooms.

Simply put, the removal of the four Klamath Dams represents the most significant opportunity to bolster salmon recovery on the West Coast. PacifiCorp and settlement parties agreed that the best path forward to secure both economic and environmental benefits was to decommission the four hydroelectric dams. This conclusion was supported by the California and Oregon Public Utility Commissions, which found that decommissioning the dams was in the best interest of PacifiCorp’s customers. The Klamath River Renewal Corporation is fully capable of carrying out the project.

The decommissioning and ultimate removal of the four Klamath Dams not only makes economic sense, but would greatly benefit the Klamath-origin salmon fisheries and all other Klamath Basin public resources that have been adversely affected by these dams over the past 100 years.

I urge FERC to approve this proposed License Amendment and transfer to the KRRC for purposes of removing the four Klamath Dams and overseeing the restoration of the Klamath River.

Sincerely,

[Your Name]

Sincerely,
Brian J. Johnson
California Director
Trout Unlimited

Posted in Oregon Conservation News, Oregon Fly Fishing Clubs and Events | Leave a comment

Nicholas’ Mini Fish Taco Tube Steelhead Fly

Nicholas' Mini Fish Taco Tube Steelhead Fly

Nicholas’ Mini Fish Taco Tube Steelhead Fly

This is a downsized version of the fly tied by my friend Jeff Hickman—tied on a Pro Sportfisher Classic Tube. The entire series of the Fish Taco flies are well established as effective patterns to fish for steelhead and salmon. One of their key features is the fact they they are not weighted.

This fly’s light weight means that the fly will not “bottom out” at the end of the swing when the fly arrives in slow inside water. This is crucial because this is the zone where many grabs come either because this is where the fish are laying or because this is where the fish have followed the fly from deeper water.

Here are the basic ingredients for this pattern

Thread – Veevus 10/0 Red
Preferred cement – Brush on Lok Tite
Tube Mandrel – Pro Sportfisher Flexineedle, large
Tube – Pro Sportfisher Classic Tube (med fl. Pink)
Butt – Chartreuse Ice Dub, #54
Wire – Ultra Wire, Copper, small
Body – Senyo’s Fusion Dub, Pink Lady
Palmer Hackle – pink dyed grizzly saddle
Alternate Saddle – (Old Trout Saddle Pack)
Shoulder Dubbing Ball – Senyo’s Fusion Dub, Eat-a-Peach
Ostrich – Pink UV2 Ostrich Plume
Flash – holographic pink #6988 Flashabou
Colar Hackle – Schlappen, Fl. Shrimp Pink
Facing Collar – Blue Dyed Guinea Large UV2
Cone – Pro Sportfisher Metallic Blue Ultrasonic Disc, medium

One key feature of this tube fly is that the hook should be rigged on a loop, with the knot pulled into the rear of the tube. By varying the size of the loop, you are able to place the hook as close or as far back from the body of the fly as you wish.

I hope you find this useful and have fun with this fly on the water—it is a winner!

Jay Nicholas, Autumn 2017

Posted in Fly Tying, Fly Tying Materials and Supplies | Leave a comment

Season Five at Cedar Lodge

IMG_5345

This Saturday the family and I travel to the South Island for our fifth season of ownership at Cedar Lodge on the South Island of New Zealand. We are hopeful for a better spring/summer start and finish to the weather. Last year was a bit brutal, memories of sideways rain and blown out rivers are a bit to fresh. Guests and staff are very much looking forward to still sunny days and big fish on dry flies. For some reason everyone is just in a better mood all around when the sun is shining.

IMG_6768

IMG_5302

The draw to New Zealand remains the same for me. Sight fishing in clear rivers with large rainbow and brown trout willing to take the well presented fly is simply hard to beat. The setting at Cedar Lodge as well as our ability to quickly get remote makes it the ideal location.

IMG_8532

If you are thinking about a trip to New Zealand please check out our website at Cedarlodge.net, or send us an email at info@cedarlodge.net. We do still have a few spots remaining for the 2017-2018 season. Air New Zealand and Fiji Air are currently running some pretty sweet deals on airfare.

DSCN0456

CD

Posted in Fly Fishing Travel | Leave a comment

ECHO Boost Beach Fly Rod Review

Echo Boost Beach fly rod with coho salmon on end of the line really I swear!

Echo Boost Beach fly rod with coho salmon on end of the line really I swear!

I’ve been fishing ECHO’s Boost Beach Rod, the 7 wt, for a few months now. This is a great rod that Tim has, far as I’m concerned, hit it out of the park.

I’ve fished this rod with both #7 and #8 Airflo Beach lines – I’ve also fished it with a RIO outbound and a Cortland Blitz 350 gr line. I’ve fished the Boost Beach in the estuary and in the ocean from dory boats. Marty Sheppard casts this rod with a sustained anchor, but I use an overhead cast. Marty makes it look easy, and I’m sure I could also if I really tried to.

I’ve caught spring chinook in the estuary on the Boost Beach; silvers in the ocean, black rockfish and lingcod in the ocean.

Marty and Mia Sheppard on Kevin's dory - Marty fishing the ECHO Boost Beach rod.

Marty and Mia Sheppard on Kevin’s dory – Marty fishing the ECHO Boost Beach rod.

The 7 wt Boost Beach is 12 ft 1 in long and the price is a shocker in a good way.

Advantages of the Boost Beach? This rod is a genuine advantage when I’m  estuary casting in a wind. This rod allows me to cast without smacking myself in the head with a Clouser. The long length of the rod makes fighting a fish a ton of fun because you REALLY get a bend in the rod and it will cushion your leader from sudden surges by the fish.

I would recommend this rod highly for anyone fishing from the beach, especially, because it will get your back cast up over the grass, rocks, sand, oysters, and what not behind you.

My biggest trouble with this rod is figuring out what size fish I should be targeting with the 7 wt. I’ve caught sea run cutthroat of 12 – 16 inches on the rod and felt that the fish were not at all overpowered.

I’ve also caught 6 pound silvers and 10 pound spring chinook and didn’t feel like I was under-gunned. I’m convinced that this is a striper and sea-run and surf perch rod. It darn sure is a black bass and lingcod rod.

Thanks to Kevin for hosting us all on your dory!

Thanks to Kevin for hosting us all on your dory!

My single reservation is that the hook set on larger fish should be accomplished with a strip set and not with a trout-set. I have not had a problem with setting a hook with this rod, because I have not had a grab from a big king on this rod. Simply stated, I think the rod is not stiff enough to set into a bony mouth on a lift the rod trout set.

I should also note that I prefer to fish lines that are far heavier than ECHO recommends for this rod series. In practical terms this means that you could probably fish a number of lines and do not need to obsess over the precise gr wt of the line you spool on your reel when you fish this rod.

I’m available to answer any questions you may have about the ECHO Boost Beach rod – in my opinion this is a great fly rod for multiple purpose use and offered at a great price too.

Jay Nicholas – October 2017

 

Posted in Fishing Reports, Fly Fishing Gear Review | 2 Comments

Fall Guide Special on Now through November 2017

We have had some serious rain recently and river levels have really come up. A more settled pattern is developing and it looks like we will have an extended trout season.

mckenzie-river-levels-late-oct-2017

Start of fall on the McKenzie

We are offering a shortened half day trip on our local waters for trout and steelhead for the rest of October and November. The cost of the trip is $325. The trip includes guided fishing and equipment for two anglers. The trip does not include lunch. The trip is designed to hit the best time of day from, we recommend approximately 11:00am-4:30pm. This is a great opportunity to learn some of our close in to the Eugene/Springfield waters.

Give us a ring to discuss options, water conditions and booking possibilities.

Phone (541) 342 7005 Email: caddiseug@yahoo.com

Photo _14 copy

Posted in Lower Willamette, McKenzie River, Middle Fork Willamette River fishing | Leave a comment

Blood Knots Creative – “Our Two Hands” Film Tour Comes to Eugene Friday, November 3rd

From the Oregon Council of Trout Unlimited

The Oregon Council of Trout Unlimited is proud to present a showing of the new film from Bloodknots Creative, “Our Two Hands” on Friday, November 3rd at Falling Sky Brewing’s Pizzeria and Public House in the UofO’s Erb Memorial Union Building. Doors open at 6:30pm and film starts at 7pm. For more information, see the event Facebook page.

The film features interviews with a who’s-who list of Pacific Northwest guides, outfitters, conservationists, and salmon and steelhead experts, and examines the current state of the region’s charismatic anadromous fish populations and factors contributing to their decline.

Come out and enjoy an evening of fish, film, pizza and brews and thanks to Falling Sky’s generous offer, 25% of beverage sales will benefit the Oregon Council of TU. Bring some extra cash as door prizes and a raffle will also benefit the Council’s work to protect, reconnect, and restore Oregon’s coldwater fisheries and the watersheds that sustain them.

Our Two Hands from BLOODKNOTS on Vimeo.

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

2017 OCTU State Project | Chub Slough – Springfield, Oregon

oregon tu project

From the Oregon Council of Trout Unlimited

Dear Oregon Trout Unlimited Members,

This is your invitation to participate in the annual Oregon Trout Unlimited state conservation project. On Sunday, November 5th, the Oregon Council of Trout Unlimited will be collaborating with the Mckenzie River Trust to restore an important side channel of the Mckenzie River, near Springfield, Oregon. All TU members in Oregon are invited to volunteer.

In 2015, the Mckenzie River Trust acquired the 31-acre “Chub Slough” property as part of its plan to protect 200 acres of riparian and floodplain habitat along the Mckenzie. The area we’ll be working provides high quality Chinook salmon rearing habitat and important habitat for Oregon Chub and red-legged frogs. The property serves an important function in the Oregon Chub recovery plan, and hosts a protected population on-site. You can read more about the Chub Slough property here.

For this project, we will be removing invasive species (primarily clematis, reed canary grass, and blackberry) from the riparian zone to enhance fish habitat. We recommend volunteers bring work gloves, boots, rain gear and any other good gear to stay dry and warm in case of cold weather. The Mckenzie River Trust will provide clippers, shovels, and all necessary tools.

We will meet at 10:00am at 36412 Camp Creek Road, Springfield, OR 97478, and expect to finish around 2:00pm. McKenzie River Trust will have large event signs and arrows out to help guide you off the road and toward the parking area. Due to limited parking at the site, we encourage folks to carpool to the property from the corner of 42nd St. & Marcola Rd. in Springfield.

We hope to get as many Oregon TU members together as possible to commit a few hours each for this conservation project. This is a great opportunity to meet like-minded folks, get outside, and be involved in protecting what motivated us all to join TU in the first place: freshwater and fish.

The Oregon Council’s Conservation Co-Chairs, James Fraser and Matt Query, are in charge of coordinating the volunteers for this project. Please RSVP to James (jamesfraser@lclark.edu) or Matt (mattquery@lclark.edu) if you plan on attending on November 5th, even if you cannot commit to a full day. We’d love to have you all the same.

Thank you all in advance, and we hope to see you next month!

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

Help Defend Bristol Bay Today – Last Day for Public Comment

AK-BB-aerial

https://www.wildsalmoncenter.org/2017/07/24/help-defend-bristol-bay/

Posted in Oregon Conservation News | Leave a comment

Fall Guide Special on Now through November 2017

Start of fall on the McKenzie

We are offering a shortened half day trip on our local waters for trout and steelhead for the rest of October and November. The cost of the trip is $325. The trip includes guided fishing and equipment for two anglers. The trip does not include lunch. The trip is designed to hit the best time of day from, we recommend approximately 11:00am-4:30pm. This is a great opportunity to learn some of our close in to the Eugene/Springfield waters.

Give us a ring to discuss options, water conditions and booking possibilities.

Phone (541) 342 7005 Email: caddiseug@yahoo.com

Photo _14 copy

Posted in Fishing Reports, Lower Willamette, McKenzie River, Middle Fork Willamette River fishing | Leave a comment

Book Signing Today Sunday October 14th 2017 – Modern Steelhead Flies

MSF Cover

In case you haven’t heard, the new book Modern Steelhead Flies is finally in print, and the authors are coming to Eugene this Sunday to hang out and sign books. Our good friends Rob Russell and Jay Nicholas will be at the Caddis Fly from 12:00 Noon until 3:00PM this Sunday, October 15th. Photographer Jon Jensen, whose photographic skills were key to making the book, is also hoping to attend.

Modern Steelhead Flies is a 300+ page, hardcover edition published by Stackpole Books. The book bridges a major gap in steelhead-fly literature, picking up the story in 1993 and bringing us to the present day. It’s the first book of its kind to bring the Pacific and Great Lakes schools together under one roof. It’s also unique for its analysis of steelhead fly evolution, and for presenting an “emergent hypothesis” regarding the importance of sculpins as a protagonist (spoiler alert!). The book features over 400 fly patterns from 66 contributing tiers, and over 1000 beautiful photos. Step-by-step tying instructions are included for 14 patterns, including two versions of the Intruder. The list of featured tiers includes several of our local luminaries: Ethan Nickel, Matt Ramsey, Barrett Christiansen, Jason Cichy, Dean Finnerty, and of course, our very own Jay Nicholas.

??????

The authors will be on hand to sign books and share stories from their 6 years creating Modern Steelhead Flies. We hope you can join us and pick up a signed copy for your fishing library, or as a gift to your favorite steelheader!


Photos: Cover image, Jerry French Fly Box, Justin Miller Fly Box

Rob Russell and I will be at the Shop from roughly 10 AM until 3 PM on Sunday, October 15th – we will be really pleased to see you there!

Future venues for book signing will be scheduled at other PNW fly shops as we can manage so if we miss you this weekend there will be additional opportunities yet to come.

Jay Nicholas and Rob Russell – October 2017

Posted in Fly Fishing Books | Leave a comment